AALS | Associate of Arts in Liberal Studies

Associate Degree Courses at CalSouthern

The following associate degree courses comprise the curriculum of CalSouthern’s Associate of Arts in Liberal Studies (AALS) program. If you have questions regarding any of these associates degree courses, or about CalSouthern’s AALS program, please contact an Enrollment Advisor today.

English

MATH 1215 Calculus

Credits : 3

Calculus has been referred to as classical math going back to Archimedes (around 225 BC) but was developed into what it is now in the late 1600’s by Newton and Leibnitz. This course emphasizes skills, theory, and applications. Course topics include: functions and graphs, limits and continuity, differentiation and integration of algebraic, logarithmic, and exponential functions; the mean value theorem; and antiderivatives. Graphing calculators are recommended.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Illustrate the graph of a function.
  • Solve linear functions
  • Analyze the techniques of differentiation.
  • Distinguish between product and quotient rules.
  • Summarize the elasticity of demand.
  • Classify exponential functions.
  • Evaluate the differentiation of logarithmic functions.
  • Illustrate the area between curves and average value.
  • Distinguish between the definite integral and the fundamental theorem of calculus.
  • Simplify integration by parts using integral tables.
  • Describe improper integrals and the relationship to continuous probability.
  • Explain the method of least-squares.
  • Define constrained optimization.
  • Integrate the course concepts through interaction with other Learners and your Mentor.
  • Introduce self and explain course expectations.
  • Evaluate information critically and competently.
  • Perform algebraic functions.
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Humanities

MATH 1215 Calculus

Credits : 3

Calculus has been referred to as classical math going back to Archimedes (around 225 BC) but was developed into what it is now in the late 1600’s by Newton and Leibnitz. This course emphasizes skills, theory, and applications. Course topics include: functions and graphs, limits and continuity, differentiation and integration of algebraic, logarithmic, and exponential functions; the mean value theorem; and antiderivatives. Graphing calculators are recommended.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Illustrate the graph of a function.
  • Solve linear functions
  • Analyze the techniques of differentiation.
  • Distinguish between product and quotient rules.
  • Summarize the elasticity of demand.
  • Classify exponential functions.
  • Evaluate the differentiation of logarithmic functions.
  • Illustrate the area between curves and average value.
  • Distinguish between the definite integral and the fundamental theorem of calculus.
  • Simplify integration by parts using integral tables.
  • Describe improper integrals and the relationship to continuous probability.
  • Explain the method of least-squares.
  • Define constrained optimization.
  • Integrate the course concepts through interaction with other Learners and your Mentor.
  • Introduce self and explain course expectations.
  • Evaluate information critically and competently.
  • Perform algebraic functions.
Back


Mathematics

MATH 1215 Calculus

Credits : 3

Calculus has been referred to as classical math going back to Archimedes (around 225 BC) but was developed into what it is now in the late 1600’s by Newton and Leibnitz. This course emphasizes skills, theory, and applications. Course topics include: functions and graphs, limits and continuity, differentiation and integration of algebraic, logarithmic, and exponential functions; the mean value theorem; and antiderivatives. Graphing calculators are recommended.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Illustrate the graph of a function.
  • Solve linear functions
  • Analyze the techniques of differentiation.
  • Distinguish between product and quotient rules.
  • Summarize the elasticity of demand.
  • Classify exponential functions.
  • Evaluate the differentiation of logarithmic functions.
  • Illustrate the area between curves and average value.
  • Distinguish between the definite integral and the fundamental theorem of calculus.
  • Simplify integration by parts using integral tables.
  • Describe improper integrals and the relationship to continuous probability.
  • Explain the method of least-squares.
  • Define constrained optimization.
  • Integrate the course concepts through interaction with other Learners and your Mentor.
  • Introduce self and explain course expectations.
  • Evaluate information critically and competently.
  • Perform algebraic functions.
Back


Natural Science

MATH 1215 Calculus

Credits : 3

Calculus has been referred to as classical math going back to Archimedes (around 225 BC) but was developed into what it is now in the late 1600’s by Newton and Leibnitz. This course emphasizes skills, theory, and applications. Course topics include: functions and graphs, limits and continuity, differentiation and integration of algebraic, logarithmic, and exponential functions; the mean value theorem; and antiderivatives. Graphing calculators are recommended.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Illustrate the graph of a function.
  • Solve linear functions
  • Analyze the techniques of differentiation.
  • Distinguish between product and quotient rules.
  • Summarize the elasticity of demand.
  • Classify exponential functions.
  • Evaluate the differentiation of logarithmic functions.
  • Illustrate the area between curves and average value.
  • Distinguish between the definite integral and the fundamental theorem of calculus.
  • Simplify integration by parts using integral tables.
  • Describe improper integrals and the relationship to continuous probability.
  • Explain the method of least-squares.
  • Define constrained optimization.
  • Integrate the course concepts through interaction with other Learners and your Mentor.
  • Introduce self and explain course expectations.
  • Evaluate information critically and competently.
  • Perform algebraic functions.
Back


Social Science

MATH 1215 Calculus

Credits : 3

Calculus has been referred to as classical math going back to Archimedes (around 225 BC) but was developed into what it is now in the late 1600’s by Newton and Leibnitz. This course emphasizes skills, theory, and applications. Course topics include: functions and graphs, limits and continuity, differentiation and integration of algebraic, logarithmic, and exponential functions; the mean value theorem; and antiderivatives. Graphing calculators are recommended.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Illustrate the graph of a function.
  • Solve linear functions
  • Analyze the techniques of differentiation.
  • Distinguish between product and quotient rules.
  • Summarize the elasticity of demand.
  • Classify exponential functions.
  • Evaluate the differentiation of logarithmic functions.
  • Illustrate the area between curves and average value.
  • Distinguish between the definite integral and the fundamental theorem of calculus.
  • Simplify integration by parts using integral tables.
  • Describe improper integrals and the relationship to continuous probability.
  • Explain the method of least-squares.
  • Define constrained optimization.
  • Integrate the course concepts through interaction with other Learners and your Mentor.
  • Introduce self and explain course expectations.
  • Evaluate information critically and competently.
  • Perform algebraic functions.
Back


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