JD | Juris Doctor

Juris Doctor Disclosure

The following disclosure is required by the California Committee of Bar Examiners:

“The method of instruction at this law school for the Juris Doctor (JD) degree program is principally by correspondence.

Students enrolled in the JD degree program at this law school who successfully complete the first year of law study must pass the First-Year Law Students’ Examination required by Business and Professions Code Section 6060(h) and Rule 4.55 of Title 4, Division 1, Chapter 5 of the Rules of the State Bar of California as part of the requirements to qualify to take the California Bar Examination. A student who passes the First-Year Law Students’ Examination within three (3) administrations of the examination after first becoming eligible to take it will receive credit for all legal studies completed to the time the examination is passed. A student who does not pass the examination within three (3) administrations of the examination after first becoming eligible to take it must be promptly disqualified from the law school’s JD degree program. If the dismissed student subsequently passes the examination, the student is eligible for re-enrollment in this law school’s JD program, but will receive credit for only one year of legal study.

Study at, or graduation from, this law school may not qualify a student to take the bar examination or to satisfy the requirements for admission to practice in jurisdictions other than California. A student intending to seek admission to practice law in a jurisdiction other than California should contact the admitting authority in that jurisdiction for information regarding the legal education requirements in that jurisdiction for admission to the practice of law.” End of Disclosure.

* Under the California Committee of Bar Examiners’ rules, a “distance-learning law school” must require that students participate in not less than 135 hours of synchronous (live) interactive classes per year. Because so many CalSouthern learners reside in different time zones, work full time, and choose the flexibility of distance education, it would be an unreasonable hardship to require learners to be available on specific days and at specific times. Therefore, the University continues to offer a law program that does not require learners to participate in live classes and has elected to be classified as a “correspondence law school” under the rules of the California Committee of Bar Examiners, even though its programs are delivered entirely online. (It is important for learners to note that this classification has no bearing on a learner’s eligibility to sit for the California bar examination or admission to practice law in California.)

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